GENESIS INC

Hampstead Theatre 

 

 

 

 

 

'Laura Howard is unshowily brilliant as the financially successful best friend'

Whatsonstage

 

 

FALL OF THE KINGDOM RISE OF THE FOOTSOLDIER 

ALWAYS ORANGE 

 

MAKING MISCHIEF 

THE FIRST FESTIVAL OF BOLD AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING NEW PLAYS AT THE OTHER PLACE

 
 
Crushed Shells & Mud

Laura as SARAH in Ben Mugrove's new play

CRUSHED SHELLS & MUD at The Southwark Playhouse Autumn 2015

 

 

 

INVINCIBLE

★★★★ 

Immaculate performances” 

The Guardian

 

★★★★ 

Highly Entertaining” 

The Times

 

★★★★

A domestic farce in the tradition of Ayckbourn and Leigh

Whatsonstage

 

★★★★ 

Not much theatre makes me laugh out loud continually but Invincible, a spiky new comedy of culture clash and embarrassment from Torben Betts, is a rare and cherishable example.” 

Evening Standard

 

 

                                                                              

 

 

 

'Laura Howard delivers an agonisingly physical performance as the Marxist/Buddist Emily, twisted by disappointment while searching for redemption.'

The Stage

 

'Laura Howard is brilliant as the brittle Emily.'

Official London Theatre

 

'Laura Howard captures the essence of the character to perfection'.

The Public Reviews

Young Dracula

 

 

 

 

 

Lost in Yonkers

'The cast is excellent, with a stand-out performance from Laura Howard as Aunt Bella, still living at home and desperate to break away, but hampered by her mother’s selfishness. Bella’s view of the world might be childish, but her resolute demand for love as her right is both piercingly astute and heartbreaking.'

The Stage

 

'Laura Howard brings her [Bella] to life, a damaged soul with an emotional life and physical needs which are only slowly revealed.'

Whatsonstage

 

'Laura Howard as Bella is particularly commendable with a beautifully sensitive and emotionally deep performance that moves her beyond the stereotype of many of Simon's characters...'

Harrow Times

 

'But behind the bluff humour and the comic strokes, there also lies a tragedy of almost Chekhovian proportions, the way in which the family has been affected by the complete closing-down of its matriarch – Laura Howard’s Bella epitomising this perfectly with what has to be considered one of the outstanding performances of the year. Her learning difficulties mean that people rarely take her seriously, especially in her fractured family, but every utterance is rooted in her own truth. From the backtracking from a faux pas about the boys’ mother to the incendiary statement of her lifelong intents as she finally gathers enough courage, Bella is utterly without guile and Howard breathes an incredible naturalism into her which is just heart-breakingly effective, especially as she still has to ask for someone to comfort her, even at her lowest point.'

The Public Reviews

 

 

 

© 2017 Laura Howard  

Brandon Bishop Photography